Best Of Red Sea , Two Weeks Safari

What you expect to see?

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Schedule

SS Thistlegorm

The Thistlegorm, on the west coast of the Sinai Peninsula and 40 km from Sharm El Sheikh, is the best known and most popular wreck dive in the Red Sea. The 125m long British army freighter sank after just 18 months of her launch in April 1940. Her last voyage commenced on the 2nd of June 1941 as she sailed to Alexandria and was loaded with wartime supplies during World War II. A long list of inventory includes tanks, aircraft, armored vehicles, Jeeps and Bedford trucks.In spite of being privately owned and operated, the HMS Thistlegorm was nevertheless fitted with a 4" anti-aircraft gun and a heavy caliber machine gun when she was drafted for war dutyBut it was never to be. In the early hours of 6th October 1941 the Thistlegorm was split in 2 and sank almost instantly after being hit by 2 bombs from a German long range bomber. The hit only blew a hole in the port side of Hold no. 5 but then cargo tank ammunition ignited, causing the bulk of the damage.

Marsa Shuni

The corner and outside north of Shouna is unique for its sprawling sand plateau. Littered in table corals of all shapes and sizes, pick your depth on the gradual slope and see what's hiding beneath each one. Of course blue spot rays are abundant, but certain times of year bring in breeding guitar rays and other surprises.

Sataya (Dolphine reef)

Large 6 mile long horseshoe shaped reef. In the lagoon some families of dolphins have been living for a long time, easy to meet. It is an excellent shelter for the night, the best time to meet lion fish.

Brothers Islands

The Brother Islands are one of the best diving spots in the world. The Islands – the Big Brother and the Little Brother– are two small isolated promontories that just come out of the water in the middle of the sea at some 60 km from the coast. The Little Brother has a very high concentration of life in a very reduced area. The walls are covered literally with sponges, anemones and all sorts of soft coral alcyonarian in an astonishing variety of colors and shapes. Of course you will find here plenty of fish. It is not unusual to see sharks: Hammerheads, Thresher Sharks, Grey Sharks, Silvertip and White Tip Reef Sharks. About one km north of the Little Brother lies the Big Brother. Situated, in the middle of the island, is a lighthouse. When it is not too windy, you can proceed to dive the wreck “NUMIDIA” which lies upon the reef on the northern side of the island between 10 and 80 m. This 150 m long ship sunk 100 years ago and is now completely covered with both hard and soft corals and gorgonias. A fantastic view! At the NW side of the island you will find another wreck: the “AIDA“. This 82 m long steam ship sunk 1957. The remaining pieces of the wreck are scattered all over the reef and just a small section of the hull can be found between 30 and 60 m. It is nicely overgrown and worth to visit. Because of strong current and possibly high waves it is not easy to dive at the Brother’s. This safari is only for experience divers.

Gotat Abu Galawa

Abu Galawa: Here a wreck lies in 18 m, which sank in the 50’s. It is so overgrown with all kinds of hard corals, that it takes a little bit time till you recognize the bridge, rail and the funnel of the ship. The wreck is very appealing for every photographer. Also it is nice to do a night dive at Abu Galawa. With a little bit luck, you can see a Spanish dancer.

Daedalus Reef

Daedalus Reef (also known as Abu Kizan) is a 400-meter-long and 100-meter-wide (1,310–330 ft) standalone reef in the Egyptian Red Sea situated about 90 kilometers from Marsa Alam.[2][3] There is a small artificial island in the center of the reef, which hosts a lighthouse constructed in 1863 and rebuilt in 1931.[4] Daedalus reef is a well-known place for diving because of good chances to see pelagic fish, such as hammerhead sharks, and an abundance of corals. In the high season one can find many dive safari boats staying overnight, anchored to the reef.

Ras Mohammed

The marine park Ras Mohammed offers dreamlike diving spots. For example Shark Reef and Jolanda Reef. Both reefs are standing on a plateau, which is 20 m deep. The edges of the plateau fall down to more than 200 m. At the reef you will find nice softcorals, fish are plentiful. With luck you can see sharks during your early morning dive. At Jolanda Reef you can see the cargo of a Cypriot freighter “Jolanda” which ran aground in 1980: a large quantity of household toilets!

Gubal

Entry takes you straight to a sand eel garden, which you must approach with care in order to prevent the eels hiding under the sand. There is a lot of life here including thousands of tiny fish in the water near the reef, octopus, clownfish, parrotfish, and butterfly fish.

Elphinstone

This long finger like reef runs from north to south in the open Red Sea. Steep walls drop to the depths on the reef’s east and west sides, while the north and south ends of the reefs are marked by submerged plateau. Sharks often swim by the spot to feed on the abundant reef fish population.

St Johns

This massive reef system is located furthest south, 10 miles from the Sudanese border. There are dozens of excellent dives. Its reefs rise up from a gigantic underwater plateau hidden in the inky blue water.

Gottat Abu Nugar North

Reef with a shallow, flat and sandy seabed surrounding it.Huge amount of marine life.

Gotat Abu Ramada West

Reef with a shallow, flat and sandy seabed surrounding it.Huge amount of marine life.. 2 big ergs, sea garden with a lot of fire corals.

Marsa Abu Galawa

A huge reef with plenty of life. Big chance to see seahorse in the sea grass.

Gotat Abu Nugar South

Part of the Abu Nugar , this is a sand bottom with scattered coral heads. Very interesting for seeing little fish and branches since there is enough sand that you can ground yourself withoug worrying about hitting the coral here.

Marsa Alam

A barrier in front of the last inhabited city south of the Egyptian coast. Here the coral gardens form large blocks that are full of flag fish, jack fish, triggerfish and platax.

Abu Nuhas

The Reef at Abu Nuhas is famous for wrecks. There are 4 wrecks here, which are today an attraction point for divers all around the world. For example the Greek cargo ship “Giannis D.”, which ran aground the reef on 19 th March 1983 and sank a short time afterwards. It is now lying in a maximum depth of 27 m and is overgrown with hard- and softcorals. The ship cracked down in the middle. The better part of the two halves is the stern section. Here it is easy to dive inside the wreck, because there are a lot of entry and exit points. Because the wreck is leaning on a 45° angle you will find yourself swimming up a stairwell which your mind tells you are heading down. This effect is very disorientating.

Abu Dabbab

Abu Dabbab is one of the most famous dive sites in the Red Sea and of all of Egypt. It is one of the few places in the world where you can dive with the very rare and endangered Dugong aka the Sea Cow. In fact, there are two resident Dugongs in the Abu Dabbab bay named Dennis and Dougal. This dive site also features friendly giant Green Sea Turtles that you can swim with up close and personal. In the shallow water, it is not rare to spot the bizarre looking but completely harmless Guitar Shark. In addition to the big stuff, there are also superb macro subjects such as the ornate Ghost Pipefish, the rare thorny seahorse and the delicate Hairy Pygmy Pipehorse!

Fury Shoal

The Fury Shoals make up several reefs along the Southwest Red Sea coast, offering amazing scuba diving opportunities with some of the most pristine reefs in Egypt. The hard and soft coral are unspoiled and are a highlight of many dive sites such as the Fury Shoal Garden. The marine life is also really great with all the usual reef fishes of the Red Sea and various species of reef Sharks (Whitetip, Grey) and even sometimes the curious Oceanic Whitetip Shark. Pelagic fishes such Barracudas, Giant Trevallies, Dogtooth Tunas are also common in the area.

The Dunraven

The “Dunraven”, a steam and sail-powered vessel used to transport spices and timber, ran aground the reef Shaab Machmud in March 1876 during a voyage from Bombay to Newcastle and sank quickly. The ship broke in two, and her two halves came to rest on the sea floor. The wreck lies upside down with the stern at a depth of 28 m and the bow at 18 m. At the stern you find the propeller and the rudder, which are overgrown with corals. Inside the wreck you see thousands of glassfish.

The Giannis D

The ship is lying on the bottom in roughly three separate sections parallel to the reef, with the crumpled bow lying at 10 meters, the cargo area amidships being a jumble of steel and remains of the cargo, and the aft section with an intact A-frame located forward of the superstructure. The wreck is populated with numerous varieties of aquatic life with glassfish, scorpionfish, wrasse, the occassional napoleon, crocodile fish, and blue-spotted stingrays along the bottom. This is really a fun wreck dive for divers of all certification levels.

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Excluded

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